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"IF IT'S CRAP, WE WILL TELL YOU!!!"

BLOCKERS - LOW RENTAL!!!

READY PLAYER ONE 3D - LOW FULL PRICE!!!

 TOMB RAIDER - MATINEE!!!

BLACK PANTHER IMAX - HIGH FULL PRICE!!!

DARK TOWER - LOW RENTAL!!!

PROUD MARY - LOW RENTAL!!!

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN - MATINEE!!!

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE - HIGH MATINEE!!!

AMERICAN MADE - RENTAL!!!

THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US - MATINEE!!!

STAR WARS VIII: THE LAST JEDI - LOW FULL PRICE!!!

WONDER - HIGH MATINEE!!!

JUSTICE LEAGUE IMAX - LOW FULL PRICE!!!

DADDY'S HOME 2 - F@#K YOU!!!

THOR: RAGNAROK IMAX 3D -  FULL PRICE!!!

JIGSAW - STRAIGHT UP BULLS@#T!!!

BLADE RUNNER 2049 IMAX - MATINEE!!!

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE -  MATINEE!!!

THE HITMAN'S BODYGUARD - HIGH FULL PRICE!!


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Black Panther Teaser 2018

BLACK PANTHER IMAX

Well Hollywood, congratulations on donning your first pair of progressives. First we got to see from the other eye of gender with Wonder Woman, and now, we’re finally given a clear vision of a fully fledged comic book hero from the heart of Africa. It took far too long, but it was worth the wait, because like Wonder Woman, Black Panther isn’t just a complete re-ordering of the muscular white male status quo. It’s also a fantastic film. Is it perfect? No. The film suffers from the same problems that plague most comic book fantasies: Emotions are distilled into high-contrast love and hate, characters never feel truly relatable as a result of their superpowers, and the complexities of the human condition are compressed into short, predictably punchy speeches.

That’s the way the genre works. In this case, it’s actually an advantage because it proves the superhero formula can transcend any race, religious or even species boundary. Black Panther is the percussion blast we all need right now, so tip your hat to Ryan Coogler (Creed, Fruitvale Station), the director and co-writer of a modern classic that addresses the deep fault lines in American society without compromising action movie fundamentals. In fact, the action may be what gives Coogler such leeway because it’s a huge distraction from the deeper issue of African-American identity, which is the deep vein that gives Black Panther its diamond claws. Opening in Oakland, California some 20 odd years ago, Black Panther introduces us to its titular character in the opening scene. While two men make plans for some criminal act involving firearms, an African king appears out of nowhere to remind them of who they are, and why they should never resort to violence. They resist, the king responds and before you know it, we’re watching a young prince named T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) be crowned the new king of Wakanda, and given the superhuman abilities of The Black Panther — just like his father before him.

The potent secret lies in a special flower that only grows in Wakanda, an African nation that also happens to have the world’s largest supply of Vibranium, a rare earth element that has the power to create the world’s most powerful weapons (this is what made Captain America’s Shield).  For eons, the Wakandans denied the existence of huge vibranium reserves in their homeland. Yet, they’ve created a huge, futuristic city with their resources — and successfully hidden it from the entire world. In this universe, a small African nation is the most advanced culture on the planet — home to space age vehicles, futuristic weapons and a fully educated population. Yet, because the people of Wakanda fear war over their resources, their advanced culture remains a secret. As a result, their African neighbors, as well as black people all over the world, remain oppressed. For a kid living in Oakland, California, Wakanda’s big secret becomes a life obsession. Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) watched a strange blue light fly over the projects the night his father was killed. He discovered his family had a connection to a magical world, and that he, too, had Wakandan roots. Eager to reclaim his own history, and his own traditions, Killmonger researches Wakandan artifacts and eventually learns enough to challenge T’Challa for the Wakandan throne. His goal is to emancipate and empower black people all over the world using advanced Wakandan technology, but also to reap revenge and kill the oppressor. Overall, Black Panther is fun to watch, and Coogler successfully pulls it off by ensuring all the small, token roles and significant sidekicks are played by white actors (Martin Freeman, who I think served a better purpose in this film than he did in Captain America: Civil War). There’s a white foe with a South African accent, as well, thanks to Andy Serkis. But the key parts, and the central drama unfolds within Wakanda, where one black prince must face off against another.

By keeping the central plots concentrated in this magical landscape, and by keeping the cultural references rooted in African imagery, Black Panther quietly — but forcefully — reaffirms the subversive message originally delivered by raising a clenched fist. The imagery terrified white power, but Marvel Comics embraced this alternate point of view back in 1966, shortly after activists Bobby Seale and Huey Newton first formed the Black Panther Party to police the police in Oakland. Coogler brings us full-circle and fuses the two Black Panther ideas together in the opening scene by taking us back to the projects in Oakland. Yet, for all the inherent rage spurred by injustice, Coogler refuses to celebrate violence. As a reader and collector of Comic Books, I say this to new fans of this genre: “Y’all better hop on this, it’s a great time to be a fan of comic book films!” Black Panther is not only just a great piece of cinema in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it’s a celebration for all people, doesn’t matter what color you are, where you come from, just go out and show your support, but do it in IMAX. Now if you’ve been watching these Marvel films since 2008, then you should know that you need to remain in your seat until after the credits are over!!! This is a very enthusiastic High Full Price!!! Bring on the next chapter in May, Avengers: Infinity War!!!

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READY PLAYER ONE 3D

The ultimate fanboy film, “Ready Player One” hinges entirely on geeky nostalgia. It’s loaded top to bottom with aural and visual references to video games, movies, film, comic books, television, toys, and role-playing games, mostly from but not exclusively limited to the 1980s. You’ll see a Spartan from “Halo” disintegrate Freddy Krueger and King Kong thwart a road race featuring Speed Racer‘s Mach 5, the Batmobile, the Bigfoot monster truck, the DeLorean from “Back to the Future,” and the racing bike from “Akira” – and that’s just the first ten minutes.  In lesser hands, a film adaptation of Ernest Cline’s best-selling young adult novel would likely have been little more than a CGI-saturated barrage of pop culture references slathered on a bare-bones plot. Steven Spielberg’s take on it isn’t exactly a whole lot more than that, but he is definitely in his element here, and he occasionally finds a little heart and soul with which to flesh it out.  Several of the details and plot points in the novel are altered for a variety of reasons ranging from pacing to licensing issues, but the basics are the same: The story is set in 2045, and much of the world has fallen into disrepair to the extent that most people seek to escape from their increasingly bleak lives in the OASIS, a virtual-reality universe so expansive and rife with possibility that it’s become a major economic powerhouse. Its creator, nerd-genius James Halliday (Mark Rylance) passed away a few years prior and left behind a quest for the inhabitants of OASIS. The first to solve the riddles and challenges he left behind will find the ultimate Easter egg: Halliday’s massive fortune and complete ownership of OASIS.

One such player is Wade ‘Parzival’ Watts (Tye Sheridan), an orphan living in the ‘stacks’ (think trailer parks with mobile homes stacked like shipping containers) of Columbus, Ohio, who uncovers the first key and fires up the competition in earnest. This draws plenty of attention, mainly from gamer/social activist/love interest Samantha ‘Art3mis’ Cook (Olivia Cooke), who wants OASIS to remain free and open to everyone; as well as Nolan Sorrento (Ben Mendelsohn), the CEO of a massive corporation seeking to monetize the hell out of it. So yeah, it’s more or less “TRON and the Chocolate Factory”.

Spielberg and screenwriters Cline and Zak Penn do have some thoughtful things to say about living too much of one’s life online, falling for someone you’ve never met in person, and the pitfalls of a virtual world in general, but these are often shoved into the background by fan service, nerdy adventure, and fast-and-furious pacing. Even Spielberg can tread the waters of nostalgia overkill and non-stop action beats for only so long before the story is overwhelmed. Granted, it’s inevitable with this sort of material, but the characters do suffer for it, and are rendered to little more than generic Spielberg-ian constructs.

In all fairness, Spielberg and company are here to play as much as we are, and no-one should expect too much pointed social commentary from a movie more focused on setting up a fight between the Iron Giant and Mecha-Godzilla. While it might not have anything urgent to say, “Ready Player One” succeeds at being what the iconic director does best, and what so many other filmmakers strive – and so fail – to replicate: It’s a clever, stylish, entertaining blockbuster designed to give one’s inner child the cinema equivalent of a sugar rush.

Overall, Ready Player One is an absolute delight for gamers everywhere, whether you grew up on Atari, Playstation or Nintendo. It's filled to the brim with references that invoke massive events of nostalgia. The cast is terrific all the way around with standout leads and great supporting characters. The CGI is some of the best I've seen and Spielberg's directorial hand is clearly put on display. It's just a fun movie that you never want to end, despite the lengthy 2 hour plus run time. I'll gladly add this to my 3D Blu-Ray collection so I can pause it a thousand times to catch all of the hidden Easter eggs and video game references. I'm ready for my second viewing. LOW FULL PRICE!!!


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Avengers: Infinity War Official Trailer

Avengers: Infinity War Official Game Spot

Avengers: Infinity War Official IMAX Trailer

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Deadpool 2 Red Band Trailer

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Solo: A Star Wars Story IMAX® Trailer

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Incredibles 2 IMAX® Teaser

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Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom IMAX® Trailer 1

Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom IMAX® Trailer 2

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Ant-Man and the Wasp Official Trailer

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Mission Impossible: Fallout IMAX® Trailer

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